Christoffer Carlsson began writing at a very young age and has since his debut at twenty-three written five novels in the crime genre as well as a YA novel. In 2013, he became the youngest author ever to have won the award for Best Swedish Crime Novel of the Year, which he was awarded for the first book in the celebrated Leo Junker Series, The Invisible Man From Salem.

Christoffer Carlsson was born and raised in Halmstad, on the west coast of Sweden. Christoffer has a degree in Criminology from the University of Stockholm and has been working as a researcher with the Swedish national coordinator for protecting democracy against violent extremism. In 2012, he was awarded the International European Society of Criminology’s Young Criminologist Award.

As outstandingly good as his reputation promises.
Aftonbladet (Sweden)

Carlsson was a voracious reader before he became a precocious writer. A child of the crime genre, he devoured genre classics from Enid Blyton to Mankell and Sjöwall-Wahlöö and, inspired by these, he sent his first manuscript to a publisher at the age of eleven. Twelve years later, his critically acclaimed debut novel, The Case of Vincent Franke (Fallet Vincent Franke)was released closely followed by The One-Eyed Rabbit (Den enögda kaninen).

In 2013, Carlsson published his first novel in the series about troubled police officer Leo Junker. The Invisible Man From Salem (Den osynliga mannen från Salem) was named ‘Best Swedish Crime Novel of the Year’ by the Swedish Crime Writers’ Academy in 2013, making Carlsson the youngest winner of the award ever. The book was also shortlisted for the prestigious Glass Key Award in 2014. The second installment in the series, The Falling Detective (Den Fallande Detektiven), was released in August 2014. The third book, Master, Keeper, Liar, Friend (Mästare, väktare, lögnare, vän) was published in 2015.

In September 2016, Carlsson published his first book for young readers, October is the Coldest Month. Shortly after publication, the book was named Best Crime Novel of the Year for Young Readers’ by the Swedish Crime Writers’ Academy.

At the tender age of 30, Carlsson is a master of psychological complexity who writes taut, often melancholy, page-turners that are loved by readers and critics alike.

When it comes to Swedish crime writers, Christoffer Carlsson is completely in a league of his own.
Östgöta Correspondenten (Sweden)
Photo by Anna-Lena Ahlström

Christoffer Carlsson was born and raised in Halmstad, on the west coast of Sweden. Christoffer has a degree in Criminology from the University of Stockholm and has been working as a researcher with the Swedish national coordinator for protecting democracy against violent extremism. In 2012, he was awarded the International European Society of Criminology’s Young Criminologist Award.

Carlsson was a voracious reader before he became a precocious writer. A child of the crime genre, he devoured genre classics from Enid Blyton to Mankell and Sjöwall-Wahlöö and, inspired by these, he sent his first manuscript to a publisher at the age of eleven. Twelve years later, his critically acclaimed debut novel, The Case of Vincent Franke (Fallet Vincent Franke)was released closely followed by The One-Eyed Rabbit (Den enögda kaninen).

In 2013, Carlsson published his first novel in the series about troubled police officer Leo Junker. The Invisible Man From Salem (Den osynliga mannen från Salem) was named Best Swedish Crime Novel of the Year by the Swedish Crime Writers’ Academy in 2013, making Carlsson the youngest winner of the award ever. The book was also shortlisted for the prestigious Glass Key Award in 2014. The second installment in the series, The Falling Detective (Den Fallande Detektiven), was released in August 2014. The third book, Master, Keeper, Liar, Friend (Mästare, väktare, lögnare, vän) was published in 2015.

At the tender age of 30, Carlsson is a master of psychological complexity who writes taut, often melancholy, page-turners that are loved by readers and critics alike.

  • Photo by Anna-Lena Ahlström

  • Photo by Anna-Lena Ahlström

  • Photo by Anna-Lena Ahlström

  • Photo by Anna-Lena Ahlström

  • Photo by Anna-Lena Ahlström

  • Photo by Anna-Lena Ahlström